What’s In The Packet?

vegan. gluten free. 100% natural. organic ingredients.
no preservatives or additives. artisanal. hand blended. hand-packaged

Tea Blend
Green Tea Organic  
Mint Leaf  
Peppermint Leaf Organic  
Spearmint Leaf Organic  

Feel

Refreshed.
Relaxed.
Replenished.

Feel
Tastes

Tastes

Minty.
Refreshing.
Vegetal.

Subtle vegetal whispers followed by aromatic and refreshing notes of mint.

Experience It

Anytime. Hot or Iced. Pure or Sweet.
Solo or With Your Fav Treat.

Best Enjoyed

Hot and – if you have a steady hand – poured from a height to aerate the brew. A garnish of fresh mint plays with this tea like magic. On hot days, it can be fun to stray from tradition and serve your mint tea over ice. If you’re treating yourself to an ultra-refreshing iced brew, add sliced lemon and fresh mint for a truly divine treat. Whether iced or hot, you’re sure to adore the bright minty flavour in its natural state, but for the authentic Moroccan experience, serve your Atai bil Na’na’ with sugar (or your fav sweetener) to accentuate the fragrant mint.

Best Served

In decorative Moroccan tea glasses on a tea tray. For a bit of traditional theatre, serve your Atai bil Na’na’ from a Moroccan teapot (barrad), designed for the accuracy needed to pour from a great height. This both aerates the tea and impresses your guests! Of course, this lush, verdant brew will be just as heavenly if served in your favourite teacups.

Pairs With

The minty decadence is a delight on its own or with your favourite treat, but for a cultural experience, try it with Morocco’s famous fried flat bread (msemen), or pancakes like meloui and baghrir. Other sweet favourites include krachel (brioche-like sweet rolls) and sfenj (doughnuts). If you are a cookie lover, try some of Morocco’s tea time favourites including, fekkas (biscotti-like biscuits) and ghriba (shortbread). On special occasions, try Morocco’s famous pastries ka’ab al ghazelle (crescent-shaped, almond pastries) and chebakia (chewy sesame, honey and turmeric cookies).

Tea Time

As you stroll the streets or lounge in your Moroccan friends’ homes, you’ll see people delighting in Moroccan Mint tea morning, afternoon, and night. However, as the afternoon relaxes into evening, only those who can handle a late-night buzz continue drinking.

Caffeine Level

Low
For the gentlest hum of energy

Taste Strength

Medium
For a rich, smooth experience

Known For

Effortless Energy. Clarity. Digestion

Brewing Guide

Brew It the Simple Way

  • Leaf

    1 tsp

  • Liquid

    200 ml (7 fl oz)

  • Method

    Steep

  • Temp

    100°C (212°F)

  • Time

    2 – 3 min

To Make 1 Cup:

  1. 1

    Add 1 tsp of tea to a teapot, infuser pot or tea maker.

  2. 2

    Pour in 200 ml (7 fl oz) of water boiled to 100°C (212°F).

  3. 3

    Steep for 2 – 3 min.

  4. 4

    Strain into cup.

  5. 5

    Enjoy pure or sweeten to taste.


This Brewing Guide details how we recommend brewing your tea. But taste is a very personal thing, and we all have our own quirks and preferences. So feel free to experiment and have fun finding your tea brewing groove! You can then refer back to this Brewing Guide anytime you want a refresher on the best tools to use, the ideal brewing method, the magic leaf-to-water ratio, and the perfect water temperature and brewing time.

Reveal the full refreshing potential of your Moroccan Mint tea with a traditional stovetop brew.

Traditional Moroccan Mint Tea
  • Leaf

    1 tsp

  • Liquid

    200 ml (7 fl oz)

  • Method

    Stovetop brew

  • Temp

    Rolling boil

  • Time

    5 – 10 min

Brew It the Traditional Moroccan Way

Tea Tools

All the specialised utensils you’ll need for the traditional brew:

Traditional Tea Brewing Tools
  1. Measure

    You will need 1 tsp of tea per 200 ml (7 fl oz) of water.

    For best results, use freshly drawn ambient filtered water.

  2. Boil

    Boil the water in your kettle to 100°C (212°F).

    Tip: Add a little extra to the kettle to ensure you have enough boiled water for rinsing and brewing the tea.

  3. Rinse

    Add the tea to your traditional Moroccan teapot, stovetop teapot, or saucepan. Rinse the tea by filling the pot or saucepan with enough of your freshly boiled water to cover the leaves. Swirl for a few seconds and strain, ensure none of your tea leaves escape as you discard the rinsed infusion. Repeat up to 2 more times to reduce the astringency of the brew.

  4. Brew

    Add a handful of fresh mint sprigs to the pot or saucepan for an extra refreshing kick, then add the boiled water. If sweetening with sugar, add it at this point to create greater depths of flavour and frothy texture. Cover and bring to a rolling boil on the stovetop. Boil for 1 min, then remove from heat and steep for 5 – 10 min.

  5. Serve

    Pour the tea from a height into a test cup (if you used a saucepan, transfer the brew to a teapot first). This may take some practice! Next, return the poured tea to the pot. This method mixes and blends the flavour of the tea, helps you determine whether it has the right colour, and as a delightful bonus, pre-warms your cups. You’re looking for a golden liquor. If the colour is light, allow it to steep a little longer.

    Finally, pour the tea into each cup from a height. You should see bubbles which indicate that you’ve aerated the tea in true Moroccan style. Hint: The frothiness of the bubbles you see will depend on whether you’ve added sugar, and if so, how much you added. More sugar generally equates to more of that delightful froth.

    Moroccans don’t mind some tea leaves falling into their cups, so they don’t tend to strain their tea. A strainer would only interfere with the aeration of the tea, and this is far more important than a few stray tea leaves. If sweetening with honey or any sweetener other than sugar, now is the time to add the desired amount.

    If serving in traditional Moroccan cups without handles, it is common practice to fill the cups ¾ of the way. Moroccan cups tend to be small, dainty and without handles, so this allows enough room to safely hold the cup without burning your fingers.

  6. Drink

    If you are drinking from a traditional handle-less cup, hold the rim with your thumb and index finger. Not only is this the traditional way, but it is also the best method for ensuring you do not burn your fingers.

    Before taking your first sip, savour the aroma of the tea in the teacup to experience greater depths of flavour. The brew may be piping hot, so make your first sip small and take it slow, testing the temperature of the brew so that you don’t burn yourself. If you’re not in a rush, you can also let your brew cool for a while as you savour its comforting aroma, building up anticipation for that first satisfying sip.


This Brewing Guide details how we recommend brewing your tea. But taste is a very personal thing, and we all have our own quirks and preferences. So feel free to experiment and have fun finding your tea brewing groove! You can then refer back to this Brewing Guide anytime you want a refresher on the best tools to use, the ideal brewing method, the magic leaf-to-water ratio, and the perfect water temperature and brewing time.

Brew It the Chilled-Out Way

To enjoy this tea iced, simply follow the Quick Brew steps, adjusting the leaf-to-water ratio based on the volume of your cup. After straining, cool the tea uncovered to allow it to reach room temperature faster. Add your favourite garnishes to give it an extra refreshing kick. If you need some inspiration, it’s delicious with freshly squeezed lemon, lemon slices, and fresh mint. Serve chilled over ice.


Want to make a big batch of tea to fill a glass jug or pitcher?

In this case, it’ll be easier to prepare a tea concentrate first. Follow the Quick Brew steps, adding the amount of leaf you’ll need for the total volume of your jug or pitcher. However, instead of adding the full amount of water, only add 1 cup (250 ml / 8.5 fl oz) per litre (34 fl oz) of iced tea you’re making. After straining the concentrate into your vessel, simply top it up with the remaining volume of ambient water. No need to cool your tea – the ambient water will naturally do the job for you! Add your favourite garnishes and serve chilled.


Tips

If you are using fresh mint, add it to the pot while the tea is steeping for an extra refreshing minty flavour. You can then use more fresh mint for garnishing each teacup or your jug or pitcher.

If you wish to make the tea sweet, add the desired sweetener after straining but while the tea is still hot so it is able to fully dissolve.

Ice is infamous for diluting drinks, but you can harness its power to water things down by brewing your tea a little stronger than you otherwise would. To get it just right, try doubling the tea leaf quantity provided under Quick Brew. You many need to experiment a little to find your perfect balance.


This Brewing Guide details how we recommend brewing your tea. But taste is a very personal thing, and we all have our own quirks and preferences. So feel free to experiment and have fun finding your tea brewing groove! You can then refer back to this Brewing Guide anytime you want a refresher on the best tools to use, the ideal brewing method, the magic leaf-to-water ratio, and the perfect water temperature and brewing time.

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